What I’m Working On/Reading: July 2019

It’s been a while since I posted, but this is the first time I’ve had some free time to sit down and think about things I want to say or share.

When I did usability testing for the redesign of the Boston Public Library website last year, we found that seniors had the most difficulty using the new website. At the time, we didn’t have time to explore much into it. We made the edits we needed based on their feedback, but I wanted to revisit this. Seniors tend to be the demographic group with the most difficulty with technology, and changes. However, they’re also a significant part of the population. I want to make sure as we look forward, we aren’t leaving them behind. Now, we finally have the time to work on this project, so here are a few things I’m reading as I think about how I want to approach this.

Continue reading What I’m Working On/Reading: July 2019

My Thoughts on Computers in Libraries 2019

Hi all,

I attended Computers in Libraries this year, for the first time ever, which was exciting for me. Here I’m going to summarize and share the key information I got from each session I attended. You can see all available presentation slides for the presentations here.

Continue reading My Thoughts on Computers in Libraries 2019

Blog Post Best Practices: A Literature Review

Image of a blank blog post in WordPress
Welcome back everyone, and happy new year! I took a break from writing posts during the holidays, as things just got too busy for me. This month’s post was inspired by a conversation with a friend. My friend was looking for guidelines on writing blog posts. She knew I had created guidelines for the blogs we have at the Boston Public Library, but she had trouble finding articles online with this information. The trouble is that most of the information I used, I gathered from sources about writing for the web. So, when she searched for blog guidelines, she didn’t find what I used.
The purpose of this post is to aggregate information on how to write blog posts, as an informal literature review. I will also include my own suggestions in here as well. I’ve broken things down by category, and included these three broad categories: Word Count, Readability, and Accessibility.

Continue reading Blog Post Best Practices: A Literature Review

How to Do Usability Testing Without a Budget

This post is about doing usability testing on a website for a public library, without a budget for usability testing, or any extra software beyond a simple survey tool and Google Analytics.
 
So, to start at the beginning, my team completely overhauled our old library website design, and for good reason(s):
 
  1. It looked very outdated, because it was basically a lightly modified version of the website we created in the early 2000s.

a. It was all static HTML pages for the most part.

 

2. The design wasn’t responsive, making it a headache for patrons on mobile or tablet devices, and for staff members trying to help users on mobile or tablet devices.

3. Certain parts of the website were not accessibility compliant.

 
Those are the biggest reasons for the switch, but as you can imagine, there were a lot of reasons to do it.

Continue reading How to Do Usability Testing Without a Budget

Book Reviews Summer 2018

I read a number of books this summer in an attempt to try to complete my Goodreads challenge for this year (40 books). Here are the ones that left an impression I wanted to share with you:

Title: The Astonishing Color of After

Author: Emily X.R. Pan

Publication Date: March 2018

Continue reading Book Reviews Summer 2018

Why Libraries Still Exist

Over the weekend, I was on my phone, and in my news feed an article popped up because it was about libraries. It was this Forbes piece (links to the article through the WayBack Machine) by Panos Mourdoukoutas, who is a professor and chair of the Economics department at Long Island University, who also lectures at Columbia University occasionally (at least according to his bio on Forbes).

The piece is entitled “Amazon Should Replace Local Libraries to Save Taxpayers Money.” After I started writing this post, the piece was pulled from Forbes, but these ideas still exist out there, so I’m going to continue with this post.

The article argued that “Amazon should open their own bookstores in all local communities. They can replace local libraries and save taxpayers lots of money, while enhancing the value of their stock.”

Mourdoukoutas said that libraries aren’t free, because we pay taxes for them, and that their value as a place to host community events no longer exists. He believes Netflix and other streaming services have replaced the need for video rental services, like borrowing DVDs from the library. He also argued that Starbucks and other “third places” take over the role libraries have as a community space, where people can go online, meet up with friends, and enjoy a drink.

This isn’t everything he said, but I want to provide a counterpoint to a lot of what he wrote above, as many of these ideas have been floating around for a while.

Continue reading Why Libraries Still Exist

Library Websites’ Hall of Shame: Color Blindness

This is a continuation of my Hall of Shame series, where I point out website “crimes” that many libraries are guilty of committing. If you missed my first post in this series, you can see it here: Hall of Shame series.

This time, I’m coming for those libraries (and other institutions) who don’t test their website to see if it works for people who are color blind.

Color blindness affects approximately 8% of all men, and 0.05% of women (National Eye Institute). This means out of the approximately 300 million people in the United States (doing the math myself) they may be as many as 12 million men and about 7.5 million women in the United States with some form of color blindness, which is a total around 19.5 million.

So, with all of these people who are color blind, what can we do to improve their experience on websites?

Continue reading Library Websites’ Hall of Shame: Color Blindness